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The Pooh Way

The Pooh Way

“ There is no hurry, we shall get there some day.”

 Instagram: @mattcrump

Instagram: @mattcrump

 

Most characteristic element of Taoism- in - action, it is known as Wu Wei.

 Literally, it means “without doing, causing, or making.” But practically, it means without meddlesome, combative or egoistical effort. The efficiency of Wu Wei is like that of water flowing over and around the rocks in its path— not the mechanical, straight- line approach that usually ends up short circuiting natural laws, but one that evolves from an inner sensitivity to the natural rhythm of things. 

 

Let´s take an example from the writings of Chuang-tse:

At the Gorge of Lü, the great waterfall plunges for thousands of feet, its spray visible for miles in the churning water below, no living creature can be seen.

One day, K’ ung Fu-tse was stangind at the distance from the pool´s edge, when he saw an old man being tossed about in the turbulent water. he called to his disciples, and together they ran to rescue the victim. But by the time they reached the water, the old man had climbed out onto the bank and was walking along, singing to himself.

K’ ung Fu-tse hurried up to him “you would have to be a ghost to survive that” he said, “but you seem to be a man, instead. What secret power do you have?”

“Nothing special,” the old man replied. “I began to learn while very young, and grew up practicing it. Now I am certain of success. I go down with the water and come up with the water. I follow it and forget myself. I survive because I don´t struggle against the water superior power. That´s all”

 

When we learn to work with our own Inner Nature, and with the natural laws operating around us, we reach the level of Wu Wei. Then we work with the natural order of things and operate on the principle of minimal effort. Since the natural world follows that principle, it does not make mistakes. Mistakes are made — or imagined—by the man, the creature with the overloaded brain who separates himself from the supporting network of natural laws by interfering and trying too hard. 

 

Through the centuries, man has developed a mind that separates him from the world of reality, the world of natural laws. This mind tries too hard, wears itself out, and ends up weak and sloppy. Such a mind, even it of high intelligence, is inefficient. It goes here and there, backwards and forwards and fails to concentrate on what it´s doing at the moment. 

 

Using Wu Wei, you go by circumstances and listen to your own intuition. “This isn't the best time to dot his. I´d better go that way.” All it really is, though is being Sensitive to Circumstances. That´s just natural. It´s only strange when you don´t listen. 

 

The Wu Wei principle underlying T’ai Chi Ch’üan can be understood by striking at a piece of cork floating in water. The harder you hit it, the more it yields, the harder it bounces back. 

-The Tao of Pooh

 

Don´t Forget to Just Keep Swimming <3

Transformation of mind through Yoga

Transformation of mind through Yoga

Juicing or not?

Juicing or not?